An assessment of the security management framework in governmental sites in Oman: readiness, importance and scope for improvement

Al Rashdi, Talal (2014) An assessment of the security management framework in governmental sites in Oman: readiness, importance and scope for improvement. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The main aim of this research was to develop a set of guidelines to establish an effective security management framework in the governmental sites in the Sultanate of Oman. It was expected that from the critical analysis on the security management in Oman, the level of the existence of security management and its effectiveness require a special attention. On this aspect, the results of this study added valid contributions to the current body of knowledge by highlighting the significance of the security management framework. The salient argument is that with the complexity of security threats around the world, without security management guidelines in place it can lead to catastrophic results.
    Consistent with the existing literature, the findings of this study have revealed that the security management differ considerably within government because based on criticality some are more vulnerable to threats than others. In order to achieve contributions in the current body of knowledge and to the aim of this research a rich methodology which includes mixed methods were applied. Accordingly, the primary data collected using qualitative approach and semi-structured interviews were used with concern people to achieve the general themes related to security management in Oman. The key findings have identified the lack of security management in governmental sites and its implications. Finally, recommendations are made to guide the government in establishing a security management framework and how to enhance its effectiveness
    and efficiency. In addition, a future research agenda has explained for further exploration.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2015 14:55
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:48
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/16507

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