Biogas in developing countries

Deader, Jameel (2014) Biogas in developing countries. BEng dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Currently there are huge amounts of surplus organic waste present in developing countries. This waste is harmful to the environment and contributes to global warming. Today the developing countries are facing three main issues, poor sanitation, energy shortage and waste management. With non-renewable energy resources depleting faster than the rate of consumption, the world is in desperate need for a solution to this crisis. The solution lies in non-renewable energy, where a reliable and cost-effective source is needed. In today’s world, biogas is the best option for developing countries.
    The aim of the project is to produce produce a small scale mesophilic bio-gas digester for rural areas in developing countries. The digester will produce methane from digested cow dung, food waste, and sewage water. The experiment on the digester was conducted using information from past studies and improvements suggested by a student who also carried out this project. A new ratio was derived based on the improvements. Another main development was extracting the straw from the cow dung by sieving, it was found to have significantly improve the agitation. The resources were easy to obtain, and in the real world are readily available in developing countries. After running the experiment for 28 days, there was a small methane yield. Perhaps this was not sufficient to ignite a flame for cooking, but the end product is undoubtedly plausible for its fertilising abilities. All the objectives were all achieved, but as always there was room for improvement. It was identified exactly which parameters affected the biogas production and how they influenced the results.
    This project also answers the question as to whether biogas can meet the energy requirements of developing countries such as Pakistan.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2015 15:00
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:47
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/16448

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