A study of the design deflections in a piled retaining wall produced by WALLAP and other methods compared with the measured deflections onsite: a comparison between predicted and design deflections and a guide for predicting reasonable deflections

Upton, Samuel (2014) A study of the design deflections in a piled retaining wall produced by WALLAP and other methods compared with the measured deflections onsite: a comparison between predicted and design deflections and a guide for predicting reasonable deflections. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    With land in high demand in London, there has been a four-fold increase in planning applications for basement developments. Along with this, Health and Safety Executives (HSE) shut down a number of basement sites in 2011 due to poor building practices. Due to this there has been a drive to ensure applications for new basements are well thought out and planned. For basements where a piled retaining wall is used as the temporary and or permanent support for the construction of the basement, a full design is required at the application stage. The main information required from the design is the deflection that will occur during the excavation. This is because any ground movement may cause damage to existing neighbouring properties.
    This dissertation presents and analysis the results of designed deflections in a piled retaining wall produced by WALLAP; calculation based on previous data collected on cantilever walls; Clough and O’Rourke method for calculating deflections and modelling the wall as a simple supported beam. The results from all of these where then compared with the actual deflections found onsite for two basements constructed in the Wimbledon area of London.
    The findings relate well to previous data collected and help to clearly show what effects water levels and surcharges have on deflection. All of which has helped to establish the difference between design and predicted deflections as well as to produce a simple guide for predicting deflections.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2015 15:05
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:47
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/16409

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