Individual charateristics, quantitative explanations and geographic patterns for smoking in England

Aitkins, Emma (2006) Individual charateristics, quantitative explanations and geographic patterns for smoking in England. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Investigations into smoking rates have increased, with links being made to personal characteristics, area effect and deprivation but what is clear is that smoking has not declined among the most deprived. It has been suggested that place of residence has an independent effect on smoking over and above individual characteristics, however doubt has been cast upon this through studies that have suggested that it is also possible that the characteristics are determined by population composition. Research has been both qualitative and quantitative finding causal links to smoking and deprivation worldwide. In this study small-scale area indicators of smoking estimates and deprivation are used to discover what variables have the greatest link to smoking and whether there are any geographical patterns for smoking and deprivation. This study applies bivariate and multiple regression techniques and thematic mapping to discover whether the null hypothesis that suggests there is no relationship between smoking and deprivation is true. The results suggest that after taking into account a wide range of material and social deprivation indicators, certain variables individually do have a strong impact upon smoking. Therefore the importance of individual variables may be hidden when all variables are aggregated in a group. The study suggests that all variables could influence future smoking policies.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/164

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