What is the state of heritage language attrition amongst 2nd and 3rd generation South Asian immigrants?: a qualitative multi-case study

Narayanswami, Kasthur (2014) What is the state of heritage language attrition amongst 2nd and 3rd generation South Asian immigrants?: a qualitative multi-case study. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The issue of language attrition amongst immigrant communities is highly relevant in the modern world, especially with current backdrop of globalisation. With this, the ethnic, cultural and religious identities of the members of these communities are dramatically changing. As a result, this dissertation will explore the current state of heritage language use and the identities of five female South Asian students. The dissertation was formulated through the study of relevant literature, namely the works of Roxy Harris, Jessica Jacobson and Stuart Hall, with a focus on ‘New Ethnicities’. The empirical study itself involved the use of individual semi-structured interviews to gain an insight into the informants lives, followed by feedback from informants’ parents regarding parental attitudes to language and culture. Key findings produced included signs that language attrition is currently occurring in this group, albeit at differing paces; that the identities of the informants are shifting; and that religious practices have a clear impact on the informants’ language use. The main conclusions drawn from the study were that a new British identity variant is currently being formed, highlighting a separation of the informants from their heritage, as well as a separation of the cultures, religions and languages of this group from one another.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 11:22
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:45
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/16105

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