Echoes of the past: a comparative corpus assisted critical discourse analysis of world leader’s political speeches on the wars in Iraq and Syria

Abbott, Rafferty (2014) Echoes of the past: a comparative corpus assisted critical discourse analysis of world leader’s political speeches on the wars in Iraq and Syria. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation has comparatively investigated the linguistic features exemplified by Tony Blair’s and George Bush’s 2003 Iraq War speeches and discussions, with David Cameron’s and Barack Obama’s political discourses concerning the 2013 uprising in Syria. Such an examination was conducted through a Corpus Assisted Critical Discourse Analysis (CACDA) which sought to interpret whether the 2013 pair echoed the language use of the 2003 pair, all the while, justifying why such findings ideologically existed. Aspects such as modality, for instance, were analysed independently through corpus based frequency data which was later stylistically interpreted within the Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) framework. Addressing the analysis in this manner allowed for the greatest level of politically relevant linguistic interpretability, which was reinforced by a capacity to draw from similar styles of investigation conducted by linguists in related fields of study. The method as a result proved effective in the linguistic comparison of Bush and Blair with Obama and Cameron, ultimately recognising that while some relatable features were observed between the pairs, that they existed simply as expected features of political discourse, and thus, did not outweigh the many differences that were present because of differing ideological intentions.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 11:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:45
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/16087

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