Prosecuting the professionals: a critical analysis of the current medical & corporate manslaughter legislation with a view to change.

Bates, Jamie (2014) Prosecuting the professionals: a critical analysis of the current medical & corporate manslaughter legislation with a view to change. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (888kB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation explores the appropriateness of the current medical and corporate manslaughter legislation. It considers whether the legislation is fit for purpose when it comes to the Criminal Law of England and Wales, as well as considering whether the implementation of a systems approach could be recognised as a way of improving the current healthcare system. Through the use of secondary archival data such as academic articles and governmental reports, the contemporary criticisms of the current legislation are analysed and discussed. It was established through this research that, the current healthcare legislation is the inappropriate response taken following mistakes made within medical practice. The consistency and clarity of both pieces of legislation are widely critiqued with particular reference the to the recent Mid-Staffordshire Foundation Trust case. Consequently it was found that this legislation acts as a token of accountability rather than as a means of improving the healthcare system. In line with the Department of Health’s recommendations it is submitted through the research undertook that, the adoption of a systems approach over the current ‘person-centred’ approach is the way forward in improving not only the healthcare system but also healthcare legislation.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2014 08:44
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:44
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/15904

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...