A critical analysis of existing research into the interface between internet sites and young people who self-injure: what are the benefits and risks of self-injury websites to young people who are engaged in this behaviour? what can practitioners learn from this research when working with and developing services for young people who self-injure?

Laybourne, Victoria (2014) A critical analysis of existing research into the interface between internet sites and young people who self-injure: what are the benefits and risks of self-injury websites to young people who are engaged in this behaviour? what can practitioners learn from this research when working with and developing services for young people who self-injure? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study has critically analysed academic literature. It has researched young people who self-injure and their use of the internet as a source of support. It considered the benefits and risks of these websites and will provide information to practitioners working with young people who are at risk of self injury. Articles have been chosen by their relevance to the research question.
    In reviewing this literature it became evident that there are themes. These themes include the terminology used for self-injury; current services and the stigma often attached them, the benefits and risks of self-injury websites and what professionals need to know when supporting these young people.
    A study of the material identified that young people who self-injure have a great deal of anxiety around accessing professional services. They often feel isolated and discriminated against and this can make them feel that the internet is a safe place to talk openly about their feelings in an anonymous setting. There are conflicting opinions about the use of self-injury websites within the literature. There is a concern that low moderated sites allow for triggering material. However, it could be argued that there may be benefits to young people who find some web-sites a source of support.
    It is suggested that through analysing the literature new ways of working and engaging young people who self-injure can be found.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 16 Sep 2014 13:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/15411

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