An investigation into the roles of product placement, promotional tie-ins and merchandising as marketing aids to the film industry: with specific reference to key historical examples and the James Bond franchise

Thomas, Kayleigh (2013) An investigation into the roles of product placement, promotional tie-ins and merchandising as marketing aids to the film industry: with specific reference to key historical examples and the James Bond franchise. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The use of marketing has long been used as a way of increasing revenue and relieving the financial pressures of creating a motion picture. However, as films are now increasingly seeking aid from third parties in order to increase production budgets, it could be argued that the use of marketing within, and in association with films has become so prominent that audiences are becoming desensitised to such techniques. By focussing on three main areas; product placement, promotional tie-ins and merchandising, the dissertation aims to seek out why the decision so use particular products might be made, how the use of that product might influence the way audience members receive a film and how the film and contributing companies stand to benefit from the partnership. The investigation of these marketing techniques will see an analysis of fundamental examples throughout film history as well as an in depth analysis of the James Bond franchise and the way in which the use of particular products has helped create the persona of the title character. The dissertation concludes that while the financial aid that these marketing opportunities provide for film studios can provide significant funding for productions and increase revenue, the exposure that the collaboration offers to contributors can warrant substantial profits. It also suggests that for as long as all contributing parties continue to benefit from the use of marketing within film, they will continue to take advantage of the techniques outlined and assessed.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 02 Sep 2014 08:42
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/15341

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