Gaga’s and Bieber’s tweeting practices: assessing the importance of human brands, alpha users and composing interactive content for marketing efforts

Jardine, David (2013) Gaga’s and Bieber’s tweeting practices: assessing the importance of human brands, alpha users and composing interactive content for marketing efforts. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (689kB)

    Abstract

    Because of Twitter’s current perceived importance as a marketing tool for musicians, the tweets produced by Justin Bieber and Lady Gaga throughout October 2012 and January 2013 are analysed to assess their marketing proficiency. After assessing the importance of engaging with followers on the platform, Burton and Soboleva’s continuum definition of interactivity is then applied to determine the extent, and consistency of, interactive content. Additionally, the use of each musician’s pre-established Human brands to encourage advocacy on Twitter and other social media platforms are assessed. The results highlight that both utilise their Human brand, but with differing tweeting practices due to their contrasting views surrounding oversaturation of content. Bieber’s sustained high use of hashtags in January suggests that product release dates alter the extent of interactive content produced. Engaging with Alpha users is also found to be neither musician's primary intention. Rather, only a small percentage of tweets are not addressed towards their entire following, highlighting attempts to provide the impression that every follower is valued. Twitter’s distinctive features are also found to be inessential for composing interactive content, with a proportion of non-interactive tweets arguably becoming interactive through personal pronouns being part of their composition.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 13 Aug 2014 13:33
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/15337

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...