Exploring fragrance advertising: a progressive examination of how representations of femininity can be destructive to women

Carberry, James (2013) Exploring fragrance advertising: a progressive examination of how representations of femininity can be destructive to women. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The culture of consumption dominates the society in which we live whilst sustaining a capitalist economy. Advertisements play a large role in circulating the products that we continuously consume, generating ideologies regarding certain social groups whilst the representations dictate social dominance. This dissertation explores the significance this has on female consumers of fragrance advertising because it is this form of advertising has the most significant impact of representations of femininity. In exploring the socio-economic conditions and consequent feminine identities, a careful argument is constructed regarding the role of fragrance advertising in creating insecurities in women. This is demonstrated in contrast to the 'liberation' that influential magazines such as 'Cosmopolitan' sell with their advertising, which sell them back their constructed identities. Furthermore, an deconstruction of specific fragrance advertisements presents a range of femininities. These are dissected in order to establish exactly how advertisements create the sense of 'liberation' whilst encouraging women's debilitation within society through sexually objectifying imagery. Rather than 'independence' and 'liberation', women are shown to be bound to commodities and subjected to gender inequality. Therefore, advertising's power in circulating ideologies which define society and culture is revealed, serving to drive the capitalist economy.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 13 Aug 2014 13:38
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/15327

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