To what extent does the objectification of the human body through the use of photography and film provide power for the director/photographer?

Britton, Madison (2014) To what extent does the objectification of the human body through the use of photography and film provide power for the director/photographer? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The gaze is a particular way of looking, often with eagerness or desire and describes the ways in which we look or perhaps, more often, stare at other objects. Until recently it was believed that the gaze was in fact male as Berger states “the ideal spectator is always assumed to be male and the image of the women is designed to flatter him” (Berger, 1972, p 64) Although this is a reflection of the social roles and sexual stereotypes present at the time Berger conducted his research, as early gender power relations put male’s onto a pedestal of complete control over female’s. However in 1983 E. Ann Kaplan asked the question all women had been contemplating since their recognition as image-makers, after forming the Women’s Caucus for the Art (WCA) in 1972, “Is the gaze male?” (Kaplan, 1983, p 23 – 35) This question has since established a study amongst theorists that has resulted in the foundation of several alternative gazes, which have challenged the sexual stereotypes and gender power relations that had once been forced upon our society. For example, male, female, racial, lesbian, gay and bisexual gazes.
    The advancement of theory since the 1970’s has impacted on the objectification of the human body, in photography and film and the development of social roles and sexual stereotypes could enable the photographer/ director to gain power. By exploring the pleasures of looking and sexual gratification in the male and female gaze, I wish to examine the connection between gender power relations, social roles and stereotypes and the objectification of the human body throughout time.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Art and Design
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2014 10:35
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:39
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/15244

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