An evaluative analysis of the effectiveness of a programme aimed at educating and informing young people in relation to prevalent myths synonymous with intimate violence and abuse

Noble, Claire (2013) An evaluative analysis of the effectiveness of a programme aimed at educating and informing young people in relation to prevalent myths synonymous with intimate violence and abuse. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Research has exposed the existence of rape myths and continual failings within the criminal justice system to respond appropriately to victims of sexual violence. Despite over forty years of feminist campaigns regarding the nature and extent of sexual violence against women, myths synonymous with sexual violence have become established as common sense ideas throughout society and continue to persist.
    Due to a technological explosion, children and young adolescents are able to gain unrestrained access to graphic and explicit pornographic material which cannot be effectively regulated by parents and guardians, encouraging the perpetuation of rape supportive attitudes. It is only recently that increasing public, political and media concerns have been raised about the situation, which has been allowed to develop as a result of the normalisation of pornography in mainstream media.
    This research study evaluates the effectiveness of a programme aimed at educating and informing young adolescents in relation to myths synonymous with sexual violence and abuse. This was achieved through a pre-test, post-test, quasi-experimental design, with a mixed methods approach. Questionnaires were distributed to individuals between the ages of thirteen and fifteen taking part in the STAR intervention and education programme in Southampton. Due to the sensitive nature of the study, the research was met with resistance, resulting in some restraints being imposed upon the research design.
    The data produced suggests that individuals from ethnic minorities show a propensity to be more accepting of rape myths and some forms of sexual violence than their Caucasian counterparts. The research also suggests that gender can have an effect on the information ascertained during the education programme.
    The research shows that the STAR programme has had a positive effect in raising respondents’ awareness of professional organisations which can provide confidential advice and guidance to them relating to any relationship problems and difficulties they may encounter, leaving them less reliant upon the misinformation they may receive from their peers.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2014 15:50
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:34
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/14400

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