Can theatre challenge the oppression felt by disabled people? An investigation into the relationship between theatre and disability

Reid, Louise (2013) Can theatre challenge the oppression felt by disabled people? An investigation into the relationship between theatre and disability. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the benefits of drama and the performing arts as an activity for disabled people, and consider how cultural disability discourses and various community arts practices can be encouraging and beneficial resources for people with disabilities. This study also explores how drama can be used as a tool to alleviate the oppression of people with disabilities in mainstream society, and examines the ways in which disabled people have developed an independence and empowerment, by involving themselves in the theatre and its various practices. By creating positive social, cultural and individual identities, disabled people have been able to oppose and resist the oppressive stereotypes and submissive roles that mainstream society has expected of them for so long. Through the investigation of the work of companies and charities that work with disabled people within a creative and interactive setting, such as IPOP, this dissertation explores the various practices and techniques used when working with people with disabilities, what methods are most effective and how these companies approach putting on a piece of theatre. It also investigates the work of Petra Kuppers and Collette Conroy, and examines the impact that they have had on the theories behind how we view and understand ‘the body’ on stage.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jenni King
    Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2014 15:46
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:33
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/14284

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