To what extent did the media, the counterculture, and the elite consensus influence public ppinion during the Vietnam conflict?

Marshall, Mark (2013) To what extent did the media, the counterculture, and the elite consensus influence public ppinion during the Vietnam conflict? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    During the period of the Vietnam conflict from the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution in 1964 to the withdrawal of American troops in 1973, there was a turn in public opinion on the war from a supportive stance to an oppositional one. This change in public opinion put pressure on the government and resulted in a change in both American foreign policy and Vietnam policy.
    This dissertation examines what factors were influencing public opinion in their turn to an oppositional stance, and the consequential change in governmental policy and withdrawal of troops from Vietnam in 1973. The influence of the media, the counterculture, and the elite consensus on public opinion is considered, and by determining to what extent each of these groups influenced each other’s opinion it can aid in evaluating who had the most significant bearing on public opinion, and by extension, the Vietnam conflict. This dissertation contends that it was the break in the elite consensus which bore the most influence in spreading the anti-war sentiment into the mainstream and resulted in the turn of public opinion and eventual withdrawal of American troops from Vietnam.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 03 Feb 2014 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:33
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/14257

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