The formation of negative stereotypes and racial prejudice through media discourse: an analysis of how the press reports on immigration

Varona-Crew, Ana Sofia (2012) The formation of negative stereotypes and racial prejudice through media discourse: an analysis of how the press reports on immigration. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation discusses how the press in Britain helps to maintain and reinforce negative views and attitudes towards immigrants. In order to analyse how the press do so, a sample of articles from conservative and liberal newspapers was subjected to a Critical Discourse Analysis. The analysis finds that the conservative newspapers tend to demonise immigrants by primarily focusing on the problems they seem to create and misreport them by exaggerating and overlexicalising certain terms such as criminals, scroungers, spongers and terrorists. On the other hand, the more liberal press tend to focus on victimising the subjects by reporting mainly on the problems immigrants have, such as poverty and discrimination. The analysis finds that neither the conservative nor the liberal press is likely to report on the economic and social benefits of immigration. The study finds evidence that immigration overall has more benefits than detriments not only in economic terms, but also socially; this information is usually neglected by the press. This dissertation suggests there is a link between racism in Britain and the reporting of the press because most readers accept what they read as factually correct. The dissertation proposes a more ample, objective and unbiased type of reporting in order to combat and reduce anti-immigrant ideologies and prejudice in Britain.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2014 15:04
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:33
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/14238

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