How do the British and United States media respectively treat the issues of the ‘authorisation’ of violence in their coverage of sport?

Batchelor, Christopher (2012) How do the British and United States media respectively treat the issues of the ‘authorisation’ of violence in their coverage of sport? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation examines how the media in the United States and Britain treat violence in sport in relation to Raymond Williams’s theory of ‘authorised and ‘unauthorised’ violence. The media presents violence in numerous ways with access to a variety of tools and methods, therefore images of violence can differ greatly. In doing this, the media demonstrates how it can alter images to promote different attitudes, identities and aspects of entertainment. Williams’s theory is applicable to sport violence and the media because what may be considered ‘unauthorised’ within the rules of a sport, may very well be ‘authorised’ to be shown on the media. This creates an interesting relationship to be analysed.
    Violence in the media is often a topic for academic study and analysis yet sport is often neglected. This dissertation seeks to restore this by comparing how sport violence is treated by the United States and British media, noting similarities and differences. Whilst doing this, the dissertation will assess the effects different methods of broadcasting violence have, by drawing on numerous theories from a number of primary and secondary sources. The analysis demonstrates that both the British and U.S. media ‘authorise’ much violence to be shown, but in the U.S. the attitude is very different to that of the British. The United States media seem to enjoy and celebrate the violence, whereas the British media see it more as a taboo subject and are at times infuriated by it. The dissertation concludes by speculating on the future of sport violence and possibilities of further study for this often ignored subject.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2014 16:40
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:32
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/14095

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