In what ways did glamour and authenticity assimilated into on-screen Hollywood costumes in the 1930s, analysing a case study of Marlene Dietrich

Rowlatt, Lindsay Ann (2012) In what ways did glamour and authenticity assimilated into on-screen Hollywood costumes in the 1930s, analysing a case study of Marlene Dietrich. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (1904kB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation is designed to analyse how on-screen costumes in the 1930s, were influenced by glamour and authenticity. My thesis will firstly illustrate the different meanings behind glamour, through it being sophisticated but crude. Afterwards, it will demonstrate how glamour is something that is on the surface, whilst authenticity is something that is more about the depth of a costume. Authenticity can be examined through whether a garment is realistic. However, there are problems with attempting to be make a film text, an accurate depiction of a particular period, whether it is historical or contemporary. The key texts that will be considered are Stephen Gundle and Reka Buckley who help to define glamour. Whilst analysing Edward Maeder’s study on historical accuracy and John Peacock’s pictures of the clothing that people would have worn in the different periods. This will allow for a comparison between these images and the costumes on-screen, seeing if they are truthful representations. This work will apply both these concepts to a popular film star of the thirties Marlene Dietrich. By this section splitting up into two parts, firstly looking how she is a glamorous star. Secondly, how her films endeavour to be authentic, but also have to offer some sort of escapism.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2014 16:46
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:32
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/14060

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...