An exploration into the issues around being a young carer

Stagg, Rebecca (2013) An exploration into the issues around being a young carer. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Since the early 1990‟s young carers have been growing in recognition and can be found to be a global phenomenon. Within the United Kingdom there are an estimated 175,000 young carers aged between the years of eight and sixteen. These young people play a vital role in supporting the needs of a family member suffering from a long term illness or a disability, providing them with round the clock, physical and emotional care. This dissertation draws on secondary research to investigate and understand the needs of young carers, focussing on the possible barriers young carers face when accessing the education system due to their caring responsibilities, and how schools can embed flexible provisions for young carers to overcome these barriers. Another theme of this dissertation is on the restriction young carers experience on their social life and how this affects their well-being and relationships. It concludes by examining the problems in identifying and targeting young carers as a group and how this may have prevented the effectiveness of policy and practise put in place to support the needs of young carers.
    The summarisation of the research showed that the needs of young carers are vast, and the realities of being a young carer were often unknown, which meant that professionals such as teachers and social workers lacked awareness and as a consequence could not support their needs fully. None the less young carers often demonstrate a high level of resilience and lead lifestyles that have positive and some negative outcomes.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Education and Childhood Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2013 14:36
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:32
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/13988

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