An examination of the contemporary issues around the deployment and use of enhanced policing tactical options in public disorder

Gardner, Clive (2013) An examination of the contemporary issues around the deployment and use of enhanced policing tactical options in public disorder. MA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This research examines the contemporary issues around the use of enhanced tactical options: Firearms, Baton Rounds (AEPs), Water Cannon and CS Smoke in the policing of public disorder. It critically assesses the potential issues arising from the use of these tactics on the streets of London. The research examines historical evidence of the impact on the policing of disorder of police use of firearms and other degrees of force, considers perspectives of police public order commanders with regard to these tactics and assesses whether such use may constitute a viable tactic as an acceptable use of force in certain circumstances. It considers common themes between historical evidence and commanders perspectives and wider implications of police use of force in public disorder situations.
    The research concludes that international examples demonstrate the damage done to police/community relations by any perceived excessive use of force; the dangers of escalating violence prevailing where police are seen to increase the degree of force and specific limitations of some tactical options in particular disorder environments. It finds firearms are unlikely to be used in public disorder situations and that if they were it would require the actual presence of a serious threat to life. Baton Round (AEPs) might be used but again with consideration of the wider policing implications, this would only be as a last resort again where a serious threat to life was present. Water Cannons could be suitable to protect fixed locations targeted by protestors but were unlikely to be beneficial for highly mobile disorder. CS Smoke is discounted as a viable tactical option.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 26 Nov 2013 10:08
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:31
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/13949

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