How the media representation of England’s national football captains has changed in the British press from the 1960s to today

Chadderton, James (2013) How the media representation of England’s national football captains has changed in the British press from the 1960s to today. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study investigated how the representation of England’s national football captains has changed in the British press from the 1960s to today. Such a study was important in order to identify the factors that have contributed to the specific changes within the British media. The first aim of the dissertation was to analyse the interaction between England captains and the British press. The second aim was to observe the differing levels of media coverage received by England captains and why certain captains received more attention in their specific era. The final aim was to determine the role nationalism plays in the representation of England captains. Through research into, predominantly, newspaper coverage that previous England captains have received during their respective tenures, the dissertation was able to gauge the trend each captain experienced in their private lives being increasingly made public. Literary research on celebrity culture suggests that the representations of England captains within the British media will continue to become more sensationalised and public due to the ever-changing laws in privacy within journalism and the effects of the sport star culture. Interviews with leading sports journalists enabled observations regarding the relationships that the press have with England captains and footballers in general. The findings from the research evidence the significance that the tabloidisation era have had on sports reporting as well as the importance that the captain’s armband holds for both sports journalists and the public. Ultimately, as media empires such as Rupert Murdoch’s BskyB continue to have a stranglehold over society, the amount of scrutiny that high profile footballers receive is only set to intensify.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2013 16:40
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:31
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/13917

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