Understanding adoption breakdown: using attachment theory to examine how the dynamics of the adoption triangle can be linked to adoption disruption

Garson, Sarah (2013) Understanding adoption breakdown: using attachment theory to examine how the dynamics of the adoption triangle can be linked to adoption disruption. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (302kB)

    Abstract

    Background: Adoption disruption is estimated to occur in approximately twenty percent of adoptions. The aim of this work is to produce a literature review that uses attachment theory to examine how the dynamics of the adoption triangle (i.e. the adopted child, the birth parents and the adoptive parents) can be linked to adoption disruption.
    Methods: The terms “adoption AND breakdown” and “adoption AND disruption” were used to search a number of research databases and yielded over a hundred publications. These were filtered using relevant inclusion and exclusion criteria to produce a core set of twenty one papers (English Language publications between 2000 and 2013). The articles were critically analysed by establishing their aims, key findings, strengths and weaknesses. The data was tabulated and subjected to thematic analysis.
    Results: Thematic analysis revealed two overarching themes; Loss and Life Narratives. These themes and subthemes were examined in relation to each side of the adoption triangle using attachment theory as a theoretical framework. This research strategy uncovered some interesting findings and cast new light on the complex and multifaceted area of adoption disruption.
    Conclusions: Attachment theory provides a useful theoretical framework for analysing the interplay between the factors involved. Loss and Life Narratives are key themes that have been identified through thematic analysis of the research literature in this area. Social services support for adopted children, birth parents and adoptive parents prior to and post adoption is essential for maximising the chances of a successful outcome.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2013 13:39
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:30
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/13652

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...