Leaving home and living independently: a critical valuation of the barriers faced by adults with mild to moderate learning disabilities living with older carers leaving the family home

Johnston, Lisa (2013) Leaving home and living independently: a critical valuation of the barriers faced by adults with mild to moderate learning disabilities living with older carers leaving the family home. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This research set out to consider issues relating to the transition of moving from the family home to independent living for adults with mild to moderate learning disabilities living with older family carers. It considered the current barriers to this process from the perspectives of service users, carers and professionals, and subsequently possible strategies to overcome such difficulties. A review of existing literature was undertaken in order to identify such barriers as perceived by those involved in this process. Research published in leading publications such as the British Journal of Social Work and the Journal of Intellectual Disabilities was critically analysed to discover key themes. The principal barriers from carers related to risk and guilt, while those from service users related to concern for their carers and a lack of understanding of independent living. A key theme which emerged was that of ‘interdependence’ where it was questionable as to who was the carer and who was the cared-for; alongside the lack of joint working between key agencies and the need for proactive forward planning and the provision of relevant information. Additionally, the researcher proposed that if someone with a learning disability experiences the death of their carer coupled with a forced move to a completely new environment with no planning or preparation, this could result in a mental health crisis for that person. Furthermore, if no local provision exists and that person is forced to move away from their social network and support, such trauma could be exacerbated. Possible solutions to the identified problems related to joint agency strategic planning and working, and the sensitive provision of information and options over a prolonged period of time to both service users and carers jointly. The research concluded that while such solutions would be beneficial to all involved, it will be challenging for social workers to carry them out in practice at the present time due to the continuing financial pressures in social care and the shortage of suitable housing.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2013 14:11
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:28
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/13360

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