The Medway Disaster of June 1667: English complacency and misfortune, Dutch superiority, or the Commissioner’s inadequacy?

Powell, Jennifer (2013) The Medway Disaster of June 1667: English complacency and misfortune, Dutch superiority, or the Commissioner’s inadequacy? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (1078kB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation is an examination of the Dutch Raid on the River Medway during June 1667, within its historical context, to determine the contributing factors. The First Anglo-Dutch War of 1652-1654 is indicative of the tense relationship between the two nations, and exploring the war highlights the fierce competition over the North Sea herring industry. After the war, the English became complacent, certain that the Dutch threat had subsided. Post-war, both nations remained focused on commerce, yet Holland managed to restructure their economy and rebuild the fleet, ready for war. England, suffering at the hands of plague and fire, were economically crippled and facing defeat. Determined to continue with the war, the Crown decided to lay up the fleet in the River Medway, and this proved detrimental for the nation. The role of the Commissioner at Chatham Dockyard, Peter Pett (see Appendix B) will be considered, particularly his reaction to the raid, and his later treatment. Although held responsible, there is evidence to suggest Pett was made a scapegoat, and this will be explored. The Medway Disaster is an accurate description of the events of June 1667, yet the poor decision-making and England’s ignorance towards the Dutch sealed the fleet’s fate, and cost the nation dearly. Inevitably, England was brought to her knees, by those she trusted most.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 29 Aug 2013 13:55
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:28
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/13091

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...