Racist Britain? a study of race representation in visual British political propaganda since 1914

Crook, Alex (2013) Racist Britain? a study of race representation in visual British political propaganda since 1914. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The focus of this dissertation is to examine the representation of race in various forms of visual political propaganda in Britain since the start of the First World War. It will present a study of the nature of propaganda to enable the reasoned analysis of political imagery. To achieve this it will look at the influence of the nation’s transformation through Empire and Colonialism, to modern day attitudes towards racial integration and multiculturalism. The following description will be at the heart of the deconstruction of political imagery – propaganda is “Any information, ideas, doctrines or special appeals disseminated to influence the opinion, emotions, attitudes or behaviour of any specified group in order to benefit the sponsor, either directly or indirectly” (Taylor. 1999. P. 1). With so many conflicting attitudes to race being put forward by British political parties, what message is really coming across from visual political media? In the last 99 years we have been privy to a host of different visual arguments intended to guide a nation’s attitude to race and persuade the voting public to get behind certain ideals.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Art and Design
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 26 Jul 2013 12:32
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:26
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/12573

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