The barriers and drivers to software use by small to medium sized firms in the quantity surveying profession

Hagon, Andrew (2010) The barriers and drivers to software use by small to medium sized firms in the quantity surveying profession. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Barriers and drivers to implementing software in the quantity surveying profession have a significant effect on the level of uptake of new technology. Previous studies have identified software packages used by the profession and investigated the barriers and drivers to further implementation. The available literature identifies the main barriers to be cost, economic conditions, firm size and maturity, lack of knowledge on the part of senior surveyors and compatibility fears. The main drivers for implementing new software identified are cost and time savings and increased productivity gains. The availability of dedicated QS software packages is not the problem; many packages offer functions which perform most QS processes, but the resistance to new software and concern over cost are significant barriers. Studies have also reported that within the profession many surveyors make great use of Microsoft Office applications and may not wish to progress to dedicated QS software. The participants in this survey were selected using the RICS ‘find a surveyor’ website function. To fulfil the aims of this survey, one hundred firms were selected which satisfied conditions classifying them as SMEs. Self-administered postal questionnaires were the data collection tool used and by following the guidance of the Total Design Method a high response rate of 45% was achieved. The findings of this survey were consistent with the existing literature, although the relative perceptions of differing sized firms to barriers and drivers investigated were noteworthy.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: ?? EDAM ??
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 31 Jan 2011 16:26
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:17
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/1083

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