Workplace violence in healthcare: An evaluation on the use of lone worker technology (devices) and its impact on the safety of lone workers in the National Health Service (NHS)

Boseley, Christine Lesley (2012) Workplace violence in healthcare: An evaluation on the use of lone worker technology (devices) and its impact on the safety of lone workers in the National Health Service (NHS). MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (971kB)

    Abstract

    In the latest Royal College of Nursing’s survey (2011), it is estimated in the last two years that more than 60% of community nurses spend a substantial amount of time as a lone worker without immediate access to a colleague for support, with over 70% reporting that they have been subjected to either physical or verbal abuse at work. The key findings from this research are that since the Lone Worker Service (LWS) was set up in 2009 to counteract such threats, with £29 million funding from the Department of Health to help purchase 30000 emergency devices, which have been deployed in 210 trusts in England. During this time there has been 370 genuine alerts, 26% have involved physical or non- physical assaults, with 13% requiring emergency services, which has resulted in arrests, and individuals detained under the Mental Health Act or action taken by a Trust in the form of a warning to withdraw the provision of care. This research therefore explores the issue of violence and aggression towards healthcare staff and critically evaluates the impact of technology on the personal safety of lone workers in the National Health Service. The research adopted a mixed methods approach using focus groups, in depth interviews and the collection of lone worker device activity data, which was supplemented with the analysis of secondary data from surveys conducted by the Royal College of Nursing and User Surveys conducted by the emergency device providers, Reliance. This research shows that community based nursing has increased over the last 2 years regardless of the threats to staff and it is those staff that work outside office hours that feel unsafe and more at risk. This dissertation is an attempt to highlight this issue.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2013 11:14
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/10658

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...