The Island of Guernsey, a critical exploration of its limited governance and understanding of their night-time economy (“NTE”)

Brogan, William James (2012) The Island of Guernsey, a critical exploration of its limited governance and understanding of their night-time economy (“NTE”). MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This research centres on the night-time economy (NTE) in the Island of Guernsey the second largest of the Channel Islands. There appears to be no published research available on Guernsey’s NTE therefore, as well as researching the NTE from a broader remit and an all-encompassing contemporary perspective, the research concludes with a case study of Guernsey’s NTE. At the weekend [in Guernsey] there is a thriving NTE which boasts 14 public houses and 3 night clubs all within an area that covers an easy walking distance. According to a report compiled by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary in 2007 (HMIC) the island has the good fortune to boast practically full time employment, which results in many young adults having a high disposable income, which fuels a thriving NTE whereby, excessive drinking and associated anti-social behaviour is highlighted as a problem. Statistical evidence is produced from anonymous surveys complied by users of the NTE aged between 16 and 34, approximately two years of arrest statistics from within the NTE covering the years 2008 and 2009. In April of 2012 the island went to the polls to elect a new government. In excess of 75 candidates stood for election to gain one of forty seven positions available. From reading all manifesto’s, printed in the local press; it appears as though not one candidate played the crime and disorder card. This might indicate a political naivety in deducing that criminality and anti-social behaviour in Guernsey’s NTE and in the island generally, is not of major concern. Appendices C & D illustrate the NTE perpetuating cycle of criminality and is meant to demonstrate the fact that it will never be fully eradicated.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2013 11:11
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/10657

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