An investigation of first time buyer’s accessibility to the housing market over the last 40 years

Vaisey, Nicholas (2010) An investigation of first time buyer’s accessibility to the housing market over the last 40 years. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The following dissertation is an investigation into first time buyer’s (FTBs) accessibility into the housing market over the last 40 years. It starts by examining what the main variables are that have affected FTBs accessibility, for which house prices were found to be the principle factor. The study then goes on to identify the factors, which have affected the rise in house prices over the last 40 years, and to what extent these factors have contributed to FTB statistics. Interest rates, unemployment, demographical factors, public confidence and credit availability, were all significant factors found to have a strong influence over supply and demand of housing, which in turn will play a role in altering house prices. The study then focuses on changes in the property market over the last 40 years with respect to affordable housing; these significant changes were examined alongside house prices and FTB statistics. This is followed by an examination of changes in the private lender sector, which is also examined alongside house prices and FTB statistics. The study sets out to collate existing research related to the principle aim of this dissertation, whilst gathering ample primary and secondary data to reinforce any findings. Primary data is collected, through the use of two internet questionnaires, the first directed at potential FTBs and the second current or past home owners.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: ?? EDAM ??
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/1013

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