Community policing in austerity: Can the policing family be extended to include Private Security Providers delivering neighbourhood patrols?

McLean, Lyndon Marcus Hewitt (2012) Community policing in austerity: Can the policing family be extended to include Private Security Providers delivering neighbourhood patrols? MA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The traditional structure of the Metropolitan Police is under threat from the grip of austerity. Jobs losses loom, real estates are being sold and internal business groups are being broken apart and reconstituted in the name of financial savings. In addition to these deep and rapid changes neighbourhood crimes must be cut by 20%, staff must be reduced by 20% and public confidence increased by 20%; as part of the Mayor for London’s 20:20:20 challenge.

    This dissertation examines an alternative method of delivering safer neighbourhood policing; via a collaborative model involving the private security industry. The research will examine the growth of private policing in community settings and assess whether commissioning certain elements to the private sector could bring benefits to the police and communities of London.

    The researcher will present public perception findings, from a study conducted, which will throw new light on what the public really think about having the private sector police their communities, with many traditional assumption being challenged. The dissertation will examine two schemes currently in operation in London and will analyse operational data to reveal if there are any benefits to a delivery model change.

    Lastly the research will endeavour to answer the question, Can the policing family be extended to include Private Security Providers delivering neighbourhood patrols?

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2013 14:36
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:12
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/10065

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